Émile Bernard (1868-1941) was a French Post-Impressionist painter who is associated with the Cloisonnism and Synthetism art movements. Émile was friends with other influential artists of the period including Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Paul Gaugin, and Vincent van Gogh who jointly influenced each other. In 1891 he joined a group of Symbolist painters that included Odilon Redon and Ferdinand Hodler. Symbolist is a movement that is a reaction against realism and naturalism and emphasized spirituality, imagination, and dreams. Bernard’s style of painting involved bold forms and dark contours and some geometric tendencies in an effort to simplify nature. Our set of Émile Bernard patterns includes several self portraits, portraits, still lives, and numerous Breton themed patterns. These include Yellow Tree, Spanish Musicians, Portrait of Marie Lemasson, African, Breton Women in a Green Pasture, Portrait of my Sister Madeleine, Brothel Scene for Vincent, The Buckwheat Harvest, Portrait of Madame Schuffenecker, Apple Carrier, and Harvest by the Sea.

Patterns Included In This Set:

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Self-portrait with Portrait of Gauguin

Yellow Tree

Breton Women in a Green Pasture

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Brothel Scene for Vincent

Portrait of Little Boy in Hat

Still Life with Teapot Cup and Fruit

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Lady with a Fan

Portrait of my sister Madeleine

Spanish Musicians

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Breton Women

Two Arab Women at the Edge of the Nile

Breton Women at a Wall

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Yellow Christ

Breton Women with Parasols

The Spinner

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Portrait of Marie Lemasson

Nature Morte aux Pommes

Boy Sitting in the Grass

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Self Portrait with a Vase of Flowers

Breton Women with Umbrelas

Vase with Flowers and Cup

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Breton Women with a Red Umbrella

La Grand Mere de Bernard

Autoportrait Palais des beaux-arts de Lille

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African

Sitting Boy

Apple Carrier

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Portrait of Madame Schuffenecker

Harvest by the Sea

Le Tabarin ou Cabaret Paris

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The Buckwheat Harvest

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France has been known as a global art capital for some time. In the years leading up to this international acknowledgment, artistic ideas seemed to be constantly percolating throughout the country. This was especially true for post-Impressionist painter mile Bernard (1868-1941). Bernard's ideas led him to express himself through several artistic styles, but he is best known for being on the front lines of art movements such as Cloisonnism and Synthetism.

Painting served as more than a form of expression for Bernard. The French artist believed that technique was less important than clear portrayal of the idea. When an idea was portrayed clearly, Bernard might have said, truth could be found. More so, he felt a simplified approach to art allowed him to visibly express the invisible. For instance, when painting natural landscapes, he put effort into conveying the sensations he experienced rather than creating an accurate depiction of the scenery.

"There I was expressing myself more, it was me that I was describing, although I was in front of the nature. There was an invisible meaning under the mute shape of exteriority." - mile Bernard

In his words, he sums up the styles he is best known for as a "[simplification of] nature to an extreme point. I reduce the lines only to the main contrasts and I reduce the colors to the seven fundamental colors of the prism. To see a style and not an item. To highlight the abstract sense and not the objective." This, he believed, help to "appeal more to internal memory and conception."

mile Bernard was driven to protect the fragility of his ideas with simplified art styles. Agreeing with his philosophy was post-Impressionist painter Paul Gauguin. Bernard and Gauguin formed a close friendship and shared their art frequently. In addition, Bernard was known to converse with Vincent van Gogh often and, later in life, he got to know Paul Czanne. However, long before notable friendships, philosophical ideals, and symbolic artwork, mile Bernard realized his ideas could take flight when he expressed them through art.

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