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Segmation Art Newsletter

October 2012

Parrots

Our new Parrots sets will soon be live on the iTunes store!! Check back soon...

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Back to School

"Back to School" is a several week period starting in mid-August and lasting through September where students return from their exciting summer vacations and start the drudgery of attending classes again. "Back to School" is a well recognized marketing event for merchandise such as school supplies, computers, and clothing. "Back to School" can also be considered a state of mine where one reminisces about school memories involving teachers, favorite classes, best friends, bus rides, and other childhood events. Our "Back to School" pattern set captures many school events including yellow buses, energetic teachers, red school buildings, study time, backpacks, and best friends.

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John Hoppner

Portraitist John Hoppner was born in Whitechapel, London, in 1758. It didn’t take long for people to realize that Hoppner was a talented artist. In 1775, at the young age of 17, he became a student at the Royal Academy. He excelled at art while at the Royal Academy and won a silver medal in 1778 for “drawing from life.” Just a few short years later, in 1782, Hoppner was awarded the gold medal for his historical painting of King Lear. According to art experts, Hoppner was best at creating images of children and women. He is well known for, "A Series of Portraits of Ladies," completed in 1803. In his career, John Hoppner created a name for himself that echoed through the Royal Courts of his day and caused him to be a sought-out English portraitist.

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The Louvre Opens Controversial Islamic Art Wing

Source: Yahoo News

The Louvre recently opened a new wing that cost an estimated 130 million US dollars. The interesting fact is the wing strictly houses about 18,000 pieces of Islamic art. This comes as a surprise to many, considering current relations between the West and the “Muslim World.”

The Islamic art wing was created and opened “to help bridge cultural divides.” The wing took developers 11 years to complete. Museum officials claim that Muhammad is represented in a positive light through the art displayed in the new wing. However, the fact that Muhammad is typified at all may offend some.

There are a number of Muslims who do not believe Muhammad should be represented in art in any way. They feel this can foster idolatry. Consultants at the Louvre understand this possible cultural clash, but are willing to take the risk in order to display the amazing artifacts of the Islamic World.

Ruined Roman Cities Will Be Brought Back to Life Through Art Exhibition

Source: Yahoo News

Pompeii and Herculaneum, two ancient Roman cities, were both destroyed in 79 A.D. by Mount Vesuvius’ eruption. Today these cities are being resurrected, thanks to many artifacts and to the British Museum’s staff.

From a historical standpoint, the importance of Pompeii and Herculaneum lies in their commonness. Because the two cities were not particularly outstanding or well known (before their demise), their artifacts give researchers a good idea of what everyday life was like in the ancient Roman world.

The British Museum will exhibit about 250 pieces of art from Pompeii and Herculaneum between March 28 and September 29, 2013. The exhibit will mainly focus on artifacts that represent domestic life, such as a child’s crib. Mosaics, paintings, and more will also be exhibited. (The artifacts from Herculaneum and Pompeii were preserved by the by gases from Mount Vesuvius.) The ultimate goal of this exhibit is to inform viewers of “how the cities’ residents lived.”

1) Picasso generally created art consistent with what movement?

  1. Cubism
  2. Naturalism
  3. Modernism
  4. Expressionism

2) Whose works derived their inspiration from Campbell’s soup cans?

  1. Georgia O’Keefe
  2. Rita Ackerman
  3. Andy Warhol
  4. Frida Kahlo

3) Who painted George Washington’s “famous” portrait?

  1. Gilbert Stuart
  2. John Hoppner
  3. Charles Willson Peale
  4. Edward Savage

4) Who crafted the painting titled “Water Lilies”?

  1. Degas
  2. Monet
  3. Renoir
  4. Cezanne

5) What artist was also an inventor?

  1. Klimt
  2. Picasso
  3. Michelangelo
  4. Van Gogh

Answer Key:

  1. A) Cubism
  2. C) Andy Warhol
  3. A) Gilbert Stuart
  4. B) Monet
  5. D) Van Gogh

John Hoppner: The Sought-Out English Portraitist

Portraitist John Hoppner was born in Whitechapel, London, in 1758. The exact date of his birth is unknown, but it is guessed to have been around April 4th. Hoppner’s parents were German, and his mother served at the Royal Palace as an attendant, or Queen Charlotte’s lady-in-waiting. This gave Hoppner an advantage at a young age, and as a result of his mother’s position he had the privilege of being a Royal Chapel chorister.

It was rumored in Hoppner’s early years that he might possibly have been King George III’s illegitimate son. This rumor was certainly never proved to be true, and was probably begun due to his mother’s high position in the Royal Court.

As a young man, it didn’t take long for people to realize that John Hoppner was a talented artist. In 1775, at the young age of 17, he became a student at the Royal Academy. He excelled at art while at the Royal Academy and won a silver medal in 1778 for “drawing from life.” Just a few short years later, in 1782, Hoppner was awarded the gold medal for his historical painting of King Lear.

In 1780, a couple of years before he took the gold medal, Hoppner began to show his work at the Royal Academy. It’s reported that he had a fondness for landscape painting, but he became an expert in portraits because of the good living it would later earn him.

Hoppner’s rise to fame and success didn’t take long; he quickly became a notable artist who many famous individuals desired to sit for. His clients included the Prince of Wales (who sat more than once), Sir Walter Scott, the Duke and Duchess of York, Sir George Beaumont, Lord Nelson, Lord Rodney, Frere, and the Duke of Wellington. Hoppner’s portraits were proudly displayed in St. James’s Palace staterooms.

According to art experts, Hoppner was best at creating images of children and women. He is well known for, "A Series of Portraits of Ladies," completed in 1803. Hoppner is noted for painting the background of a portrait created by Thomas Gainsborough. The portrait is of Charlotte, Countess of Talbot, and is now housed at the Dunedin Public Art Gallery.

John Hoppner’s style of painting is in some ways similar to Reynolds’. (Hoppner himself admitted to imitating Reynolds’ artistic style.) John Hoppner is known throughout the art world as a “brilliant colorist” due to his genius use of vivid color in his pieces. Many of his works are in poor condition because of the mediums he created them with. Still, there are some surviving pieces of his art that accurately represent the level of talent he possessed.

Phoebe Wright became John Hoppner’s wife and bore him his first daughter, Catherine Hampden Hoppner, in 1784. She later became a Magistrate with the East India Company. Hoppner had four other children: Richard, Wilson, Henry, and one unknown individual. One of Hoppner’s sons followed in his father’s footsteps and became a professional artist. Of the other two sons, one became a Consul general, and the other an Arctic explorer in the Royal Navy. It’s clear from his children’s professions that Hoppner’s greatness had a profound effect upon his family members, inspiring excellence in them.

In his lifetime, which ended on January 23, 1810, John Hoppner created a name for himself that echoed through the Royal Courts of his day and caused him to be sought out by the wealthy, rich, and famous. Today his fame is still intact, and his works are housed all over the world, in places such as the Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Royal Collection, the Tate Gallery, and the National Gallery of Victoria. John Hoppner is and always will be known as a superb English portraitist.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/hoppner_john

http://www.artcyclopedia.com/

http://www.askart.com/

http://www.artrenewal.org/

Can You Be Taught to Read in Color?

There are some individuals who read in color — these people have grapheme-color synesthesia. With grapheme-color synesthesia, each letter appears as a certain color. This can seem like a foreign concept to the majority of us that read in black white, but for those with this condition, it is common and pleasurable. It is estimated that about 1 percent of individuals have grapheme-color synesthesia and 4 percent have synesthesia (to some degree). Most people with these conditions enjoy seeing color in “odd” places.

It is not uncommon to hear someone comment that he or she would love to have synesthesia. This is because the condition is not harmful to people and it can make life more interesting, to say the least. Artists, especially, may benefit from this condition. It has long been believed that individuals are simply born with synesthesia. But today, researchers are beginning to question that assumption.

Read the rest of this story on our blog…