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Segmation Art Newsletter

August 2012

ChromaBlend

These chromatic patterns are a joy to look at and utilize a vivid color palette. Have some psychedelic fun with the detailed and abstract set.

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North American Flags

The North American continent covers about 5% of the earth's surface and is the home to over 530 million people. There are three basic regions including North America, Caribbean, and Central America with over 40 countries and territories. Our North American Flags pattern set includes the official recognized flag of each country. Aside from stars and stripes, geometric shapes, and inspiring Latin phrases on these flags, you'll find very unique symbols including nature scenes (sun rises, rainbows) , geographical features (volcanoes, mountains, streams), vegetation (palm trees, cacti, maple leafs), weapons (rifles, cannons, sabers), animals (parrots, lobsters, lions, dolphins), sailing ships, drums, conch shells, and even a red Phrygian cap!

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George Bellows

George Bellows was born in August of 1882 in Columbus, Ohio, and was his parents’ only child. When it came time for Bellows to choose a university in 1901, he chose Ohio State. He showed himself to be a well-rounded individual who drew for the university’s yearbook, participated in plays, and played basketball and baseball. His artistic talent was quite apparent while at university, for it was there that the young artist frequently accepted commercial illustration jobs. George Bellows often depicted “street urchins” and city life in his paintings. His artwork defined him as a realist painter who was unafraid to use color, light, and texture in bold and intricate ways. Bellows had a unique way of painting harsh realities, such as poverty’s effects upon city dwellers, as beautifully as more ideal settings, such as landscapes.

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Stolen Art Returned to Its Rightful Home

Source: BBC News

Hundreds of pieces of art were stolen from Afghanistan nearly 20 years ago. Thankfully, the 843 works of art were recently returned to their home with the help of the British Museum.

Afghanistan’s civil war resulted in more than lost lives and destroyed communities; it also paved the way for extremely valuable artifacts to be stolen. Appallingly, some of the pieces of art were even placed for sale on the black market.

Reportedly, the artifacts were drifting across the British black market when they were rescued by the Metropolitan Police’s Art and Antiques Unit as well as by customs officials in Britain.

A few of the artifacts that were recently returned to Afghanistan include Islamic coins from the medieval era, a Buddha sculpture, and carvings from the Bronze Age. Great Britain’s Royal Air Force was instrumental in seeing that the pieces of art were returned to Kabul just last week.

“Discovery” of 90 Caravaggio Drawings Denied

Source: The Art Newspaper

Two Italian researchers recently claimed that they had found about 90 previously undiscovered Caravaggio drawings. Apparently the drawings were found in Milan, in Castello Sforzesco’s archives.

Art experts believe this claim to be untrue at this point. One of the reasons for this is that Caravaggio has no drawings attributed to him; he probably painted canvases directly. The Italian researchers counter this argument with the theory that the drawings in question were executed by Caravaggio when he was a young apprentice.

Apparently, this theory holds no water with Francesca Rossi, Castello Sforzesco’s archive overseer. Rossi admits that the researchers, Curuz and Conconi, have not inspected the drawings in person as far as she knows. Rossi assumes the researchers inspected the drawings’ electronic images.

1) Who painted the Mona Lisa?

  1. Leonardo da Vinci
  2. Claude Monet
  3. Gustav Klimt
  4. Vincent Van Gogh

2) How many years did it take Michelangelo to paint the Sistine Chapel ceiling?

  1. 10
  2. 20
  3. 4
  4. 12

3) What type of painter was Pierre Auguste Renoir?

  1. Expressionist
  2. Impressionist
  3. Romanticist
  4. Neo-Classicist

4) Where was Vincent van Gogh when he painted “The Starry Night”?

  1. At his home
  2. On vacation
  3. In an asylum
  4. On a rooftop

5) Who was the first recognized female painter?

  1. Frieda Kahlo
  2. Sofonishba Anugissola
  3. Elenore Abbott
  4. Romaine Brooks

Answer Key:

  1. A) Leonardo da Vinci
  2. C) 4
  3. B) Impressionist
  4. C) In an asylum
  5. B) Sofonishba Anugissola

George Bellows’ Artwork is Enduring and Iconic

George Bellows was born in August of 1882 in Columbus, Ohio, and was his parents’ only child. With a father who was a building contractor and a mother whose desire was for him to enter the Methodist ministry, it is safe to say that George Bellows was born into an all-American family.

As a child, Bellows was extremely athletic and excelled at baseball; this athleticism was partially an attempt at self-defense against school bullies. During this trying time of his youth, George Bellows’ mother nurtured his artistic talent by permitting him to draw on Sundays as she read from the bible.

When it came time for Bellows to choose a university in 1901, he chose Ohio State. He showed himself to be a well-rounded individual who drew for the university’s yearbook, participated in plays, and played basketball and baseball. His artistic talent was quite apparent while at university, for it was there that the young artist frequently accepted commercial illustration jobs.

Although he was urged to take up baseball professionally, Bellows wisely chose to become a professional artist. In 1904, a year before graduation from Ohio State University, he moved to New York City to pursue his artistic passions with all of his heart.

After Bellows relocated from Columbus to New York City, Robert Henri of the New York School of Art became his teacher. It was Henri who nudged him to draw more realistically. With the help of Henri, Bellows created his early “masterpiece” in 1906: “The Cross-Eyed Boy”.

1908 was the year that Bellows began to draw some serious public attention. He did this by displaying his artwork in an exhibition with Robert Henri’s students. Some individuals claimed the paintings to be “crude”, but others enjoyed them. After this time Bellows became more and more notable as an artist.

George Bellows often depicted “street urchins” and city life in his paintings. His artwork defined him as a realist painter who was unafraid to use color, light, and texture in bold and intricate ways. Bellows had a unique way of painting harsh realities, such as poverty’s effects upon city dwellers, as beautifully as more ideal settings, such as landscapes.

“Stag at Sharkey’s” is considered by some to be Bellows’ key “masterpiece”. The painting, which depicts men boxing, is now iconic to the art world. No doubt George Bellows’ athletic prowess gave him further insight into the execution of “Stag at Sharkey’s”.

George Bellows married Emma Story in 1910; they had two daughters together named Anne and Jean. The new husband and father began to paint images such as portraits while keeping with his regular artwork subject matter. Many lovers of art have been touched by Bellows’ portraits of his family.

The American realist painter and lithographer George Bellows saw much success in his lifetime. The National Academy of Design offered him membership when he was just twenty-three. The Metropolitan Museum of Art first displayed his work when he was thirty. Taking into account the sensitivity he possessed as an artist and the magnanimity of his career, January 8, 1925, the day of George Bellows’ death, was a sincerely sad day.

August 12 (or 19), 1882, the day George Wesley Bellows was born, was one of the greatest days in history for American art. Little did the inhabitants of the sleepy town of Columbus realize that they were so near a would-be art legend. Neither did Bellows’ parents understand that he would grow up to become “the most acclaimed American artist of his time” (as stated by the Columbus Museum of Art).

To this day George Bellows continues to be an inspiration to many, just as his artwork remains an enduring gift to humanity.

http://www.georgebellows.com/biography.php

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Bellows

Seeing the Soul of an Iceberg

Something or someone’s immortalization in a portrait is a testament to that individual or thing’s value and beauty. Down through the years people, some rich, some poor, and some of little consequence in the world’s view, have been captured in portraits.

The artists that chose to portray these individuals have each seen something wonderful in their muses, something so worthy of attention that they wanted others to see it too. This is how portraitist Camille Seaman feels about her subjects: icebergs.

Read the rest of this story on our blog…